Wesley Chapel Physician Discusses the Relation Between Meibomian Gland Dysfunction and Dry Eye Disease

Wesley Chapel Physician Discusses the Relation Between Meibomian Gland Dysfunction and Dry Eye Disease
Wesley Chapel Physician Discusses the Relation Between Meibomian Gland Dysfunction and Dry Eye Disease

Dry eye disease (DED) is more than just dry eyes. It is a painful, chronic disease consisting of burning, itching, redness, blurry vision, and more. DED makes eyes feel gritty and scratchy. Your tears contain nutrients for your eyes, provide protection, and refract light from your eyes. Residents in and around Wesley Chapel, FL, can turn to the trusted care of Dr. Kenneth Andronico at RejuvaMed for the treatment of DED.

The tear film is an important layer of substances that keep your eyes continually lubricated and prevent dry eye. There are three components of a tear film that keep your eyes healthy: aqueous (watery), mucins (sticky and keeps eyes wet) and lipids (oils to keep your tears from evaporating).

While all components of the tear film are important, new research focuses on the lipid layer of the tear film and its contribution to dry eye disease. Located in the eyelids, meibomian glands secrete the lipids of the tear film, which is critical to preventing dry eye. Chronic blockage or thickening of the meibum can affect the stability and quality of tear film. This is called Meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) and is the most common cause of DED.

Physicians and researchers have found that defining MGD is complicated. An article published in the British Journal of Ophthalmology called “Meibomian Gland Dysfunction and Dry Eye Disease” discusses how better understanding a new pathophysiological scheme for MGD may give it true disease status rather than being seen as just a dysfunction. This could pave the way for improved therapies that target MGD’s specific pathophysiological mechanisms. Current treatments for MGD include warm compresses, lid scrubs, oral antibiotics, and topical antibiotic ointments.

The article’s authors suggest that an improved understanding of the relationship between MGD and DED can lead to better management of the disease. Inflammation of the eyelids and conjunctiva, corneal damage, microbiological changes, and the instability of tear film link the two diseases and make it difficult to treat successfully.

For the best care of your eyes and treatment of DED, call RejuvaMed today to make an appointment with Dr. Andronico.

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